Mine Field

Ippolita sterling and turquoise bracelets, starting at $325 at B.C. Clark

One of the oldest gemstones known to man, turquoise is prized for its distinct blue-green color. The Pharaohs wore it. The Native Americans treasure it. It’s versatile and beautiful and everyone needs some!


(l to r) Sterling silver and turquoise necklace by Jennifer Greene, $398 at The Howell Gallery  |  Turquoise, lava rock and sterling necklace by Jennifer Greene, $498 at The Howell Gallery  |  Arizona turquoise teardrop bracelet by Marcee Claflin, $225 at Paseo Originals Art Gallery


(l to r) Rough White Creek necklace, $124 at Muse – The Museum Store at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art  |  Original design by Valerie Naifeh – turquoise set in 22k yellow gold, necklace $4,500 and pendant $3,350 at Naifeh Fine Jewelry  |  Heishi bead necklace (contains a signature bead left by the artist), $436 at Muse – The Museum Store at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art


(l to r) Turquoise set in 18k gold Ippolita earrings, $795 at B.C. Clark  |  Tuquoise overlaid with white topaz, set in 18k white gold and surrounded with black and white diamonds, $2,860 at Mitchell’s Jewelry  |  White Creek earrings by Navajo artist Geneva Apachito, $145 at Muse – The Museum Store at Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art


Sterling silver cuff bracelet with turquoise and lava rock by Jennifer Greene, $368 at The Howell Gallery


Unexpected Treasure

“Spirit,” 48" x 48" (the piece weighs less than 35 pounds), $2,200 at Paseo Originals Art GalleryArtist Chris Claussen creates beauty in imperfection. He begins with distressed cradle board and applies 12 ultra-thin layers of finely sifted porcelain concrete while simultaneously embedding several hundred fragments of turquoise. After the substrate dries, an acid stain is meticulously and methodically applied to the surface. Claussen then uses oil paint to complete the composition. Rather than creating gradient effects with the paint itself, it is the acid stain’s application that controls the way in which the paint is absorbed and the resulting color tones. The final step in the process is a coat of finely buffed museum-quality Renaissance wax.

 

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