Tower Theatre Opens Its Doors to Art

SixTwelve announces new gallery to expand art reach

 


Paseo gallery SixTwelve will extend its artistic reach to the Tower Theatre, thanks to a new partnership to give local artists more exposure.
 

In addition to being a gallery that helps organize residencies for artists, SixTwelve’s writers and filmmakers also offer daily programming for kids, so visitors can’t come in and view the art they have displayed without an appointment.

Tower Theatre, 425 NW 23, has agreed to provide gallery space for local artists and SixTwelve residents from all over the country, starting with Norman-based artist Ruth Borum-Loveland and her collection called Satellite – awe-inspiring radials representing abstract notions of community, life, end of life and the universe.

SixTwelve Executive Director Amy Young says, "We are so happy and grateful for the opportunity to have the SixTwelve Gallery at Tower Theatre. Thanks to this collaboration, we can now offer more to the artists we host and work with – either as local residents, or those from Savannah, Georgia, where we have a residency exchange program."

Borum-Loveland’s pieces will be on display at 405 Magazine’s Best of the 405 Party at Tower Theatre on Thursday – surrounded by the very best the 405 has to offer, from restaurateurs to local celebrities within the confines of “favorite vintage theatre” Tower Theatre.

The Satellite exhibition will be on display until April 25. Starting May 4, SixTwelve resident artist Peter E. Robert’s Headcases (OK) exhibition has its opening night at Six Twelve before moving to the Tower Theatre from May 5 through the end of June.

Robert’s exhibition was created during his art classes with youngsters at SixTwelve; they were assigned two iconic Oklahoma figures and asked to create Headcase headbands based on Robert’s designs. Many of these figures will be included as works in Robert’s show when it returns for part two of his residency in May.
 


Community and education center, SixTwelve, 612 NW 29, focuses on creativity and sustainable living, and soon will have a community kitchen to accompany its rain gardens, hoop house, chicken coop, playground and firepit. An artist exchange program also has run from the Paseo-based gallery for the last three years between OKC and Savannah, to allow local artists to expand their audience without leaving the state.

“Our creative people are a very important part of our communities, and we don’t want to lose them,” says Young.

 

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Categories: OKC Now